Driftwood comes in an endless variety of shapes and sizes from long branch-like pieces to flat slabs and everything in between. Each piece is a unique. Some of characteristics that make driftwood so appealing as decor also make it tough to hang. Curving shapes for instance look great but curves can make a piece bow away from the wall and make placing hanging hardware challenging.    Here are my tips for hanging larger driftwood pieces in a way that looks great and is safe: - Determine if the driftwood is strong enough accept hanging hardware. Test the wood for soft areas by pressing with your thumb. Avoid placing screws/nails in any areas that feel soft or where the wood is readily flaking away. 

 - For curving or branching pieces, place them against the wall as you would like them to hang. Notice where the wood contacts the wall. This is typically where you would place a hanger. 

- You will need at least one hanger in the middle of the piece or ideally hangers on either end for stability. 

- Some pieces may require trimming branches, sawing or sanding to get it sit flush with the wall. 

- I use sawtooth hangers for curving or branching driftwood. I've found that sawtooth hangers hold well and are easier to hide on what are typically more narrow pieces.  

- I attach the hangers to the wood using small wood screws, typically #6 or #8. All are available at most hardware stores.  

- Buy hangers that correspond with the size / weight of the piece you are working with. 

- I avoid using nails as nailing can damage the driftwood. Nails also don’t hold as well as screws.  

- I mark where the hanger will go then predrill the holes for the screws to avoid any cracking or splitting. Use a drill bit that's a little smaller in diameter than your screw. For an extra strong mount, place a little wood glue in your predrilled hole before inserting the screw. 

- Now you have your hangers in place and are ready to hang your piece on the wall. Sawtooth hangers can sit on a nail or screw. Either will work. If it's a heavy piece, make sure the nail is in a wall stud or use a drywall screw that corresponds with the weight of your piece.   - Flat pieces, boards and slabs are a little easier. Perform the same integrity check mentioned above to ensure your piece can handle hanging hardware. 

- Determine where the center of weight is by positioning it on the back of a chair until it is balanced. I mark this spot on the side to be hung with a pencil.  

- I then use approximately 10-12" of picture wire attached with two 1" wood screws (not nails). Predrill the holes for the screws to avoid splitting or cracking your piece.  

- Space your wood screws on both side of pencil mark you made and roughly in the middle of the piece. You can use a little wood glue in your predrilled holes to ensure a strong mount. 

- Leave enough room at the end of the screw to wrap your picture wire around. 

- Make sure the wire isn't long enough to be seen over the top of your driftwood. If it is, then shorten the length of the wire. 

- I then use a standard picture hanger hook which is nailed into the wall. Nails are OK here. The driftwood is then hung like a regular picture. Make sure to use a hook that will handle the weight of your piece. Despite all the steps, this all goes pretty quickly and you can easily hang driftwood in 30 minutes or so. Of course, there are many other options for hanging driftwood. I prefer the neat and tidy approach but I've seen lots of other great ideas. Feel free to share your method for using driftwood as decor in the comments section.   I will be adding some demonstration pictures soon.   Thanks, Franklin